Mike Baur: Inspiration to Everyone

There are a lot of stories that supposedly inspire all who hear them, but in fact, very few stories can do that. Mike Baur’s story is actually one that inspires people. He started out in a Swiss town called Freiburg. He holds two business degrees from two universities.

That’s how everyone’s story begins. Baur’s story becomes unique after getting his first job at a Union Bank of Switzerland. For years, Baur’s wanted to get into banking. He had a natural gift for finance and that’s something one of the hiring managers at UBS noticed. He predicted that Baur would achieve greatness at UBS.

The manager explained, in detail, how Baur would proceed up the company ladder. For the better part of 17 years, that’s exactly what Baur did. Before his thirtieth birthday, he earned an important advisory position. Despite his great success, he lost interest in working with UBS.

In 2008, he joined another bank: Clariden Leu. He worked at their Zurich office for the next six years. Although he’d experienced the same kind of success as he did at UBS, he didn’t feel happy enough to continue working at Clariden. He began overwhelmed by red tape and wanted something new.

In 2014, Baur began chasing a new dream: helping new technology enterprises with young owners. He didn’t want to just open a financial advisory firm; he thought there’d be too much red tape again. Instead, he partnered with Max Meister and co-founded Swiss Startup Factory.

SSUF instantly became more than just another incubator program. It was a place where young owners could learn from top experts and each other. SSUF offered numerous services, none more important than a place where new enterprises could network freely. It’s one of the most important skills SSUF teaches to everyone that participates.

Today, Mike Baur runs numerous companies. Some, he co-founded with partners; other founded by himself. Obviously, he spends most of at SSUF working on financing and fundraising. Even though he’s no longer a banker, he’s still putting his banking skills to good use.

He’s a great mentor to young entrepreneurs. He’s not just a great banker that can teach them about managing their finances. Mike Baur left a lucrative career as a banker to pursue his dream as an entrepreneur.


Jeremy Goldstein Recommends Compromise for Employment Incentives

Jeremy Golden is the head of Jeremy. L. Goldstein &Associates, a law firm whose primary focus is to advise compensation committees. Besides advising these committees, the company also advises companies, management teams and CEOs in corporate governance and executive compensation matters. It’s an organization that jumps in to make everything easier for employees and shareholders when corporations are doing significant transitions and other sensitive situations.

All this may seem like a lot to comprehend, but the bigger picture is quite simple. For a refresher course or to sum it up, every person who is an employee or owns shares in a corporation’s stock gets a compensation package, which indicates that person’s investment in that company. A compensation committee is a group of people who decide how that package will look.

There’s an incentive-based program known as Earning per Share (EPS), and it has its benefits and downfalls as well. Like many other programs, EPS works best when used correctly. EPS motivate shareholders to purchase and offers incentives for corporations to raise the pay of their employees.

Firms that incorporate EPS as a component of their system are more successful than the rest. There are many benefits of including EPS in a company’s structure in the short term, but only a few people can see the long-term benefits with ease. In addition to the metrics skewed by influential CEO’s and the issue of favoritism in the workplace, some feel that EPS should be part and parcel of their company structure.

Jeremy Goldstein provides a solution that may satisfy all stakeholders. He recommends that firms include an accountability system which will hold executives or CEO’s responsible for their actions, instead of eliminating EPS. Jeremy also mentioned that aligning the Pay per Performance system with the long-term objectives of the company will ensure the longevity of a company’s growth, as it meets the needs of each stakeholder.

Having partnered with Rosen, Wachtell, Katz, and Lipton before establishing his firm, Jeremy Goldstein is more qualified to finish the task. He was also involved and included in dozens of the most significant business transactions in the last ten years.

Jeremy Goldstein is an administrative compensation lawyer, based in New York. He received his Jurisprudence doctorate from the New York University’s School of Law. He also earned other degrees from The University of Chicago and Cornell University. Jeremy has worked with many companies within the oil, banking, and cellular industries, and is currently listed among the top lawyers in the U.S according to Legal 500. Learn more: http://officialjeremygoldstein.com/