Luiz Carlos Trabuco Proves That Old-fashioned Hard Work Really Does Pay Off

Across much of the developed world, the realities of globalism are setting in on the latest generation to take to the workforce. In the United States, millennials are increasingly consigned to living with their parents and postponing family formation and economic independence indefinitely.

In this sea of economic despair, most realize their chances of attaining a middle-class lifestyle and living at even half the standard of their parents is all but a written-off pipe dream according to As the reality of dismal lifelong prospects in the job market and the impossibility of family formation smothers an entire generation’s hopes and dreams, many have withdrawn to a life of barely getting by, playing video games and filling their time with trivial entertainment, giving up entirely on the rat race, whose only guarantee is a life wasted droning away in a cubicle farm for starvation wages.

But even as America descends into a vast third-world slum, other countries that were previously considered intractable pits of misery climb out of the ashes and prove to the world that what was once America’s exclusive calling card – the American Dream – is now undergoing a transfer of ownership to the countries that, just a few decades ago, would have been shining Uncle Sam’s jackboots.


One real-life example of the upward mobility in the lower latitudes of the Global South is the story of Luiz Carlos Trabuco. The current CEO of Bradesco, the largest bank in Brazil, made his way from the lowest rungs on the corporate ladder all the way to the C-suite. Trabuco came to work at Bradesco at the age of just 18, having no formal educations past the level of high school.

Through hard work and talent, he was able to begin slowly moving up the ranks of the firm, first being appointed shift manager, then branch manager. Trabuco quickly proved to have a knack for strong leadership and motivating those under his command to rally around the task at hand. These skills were noticed by his superiors. Throughout the 70s, Trabuco was continuously promoted up the company’s chain of command, eventually becoming a regional manager for a now rapidly expanding financial conglomerate.

Throughout the 70s, Trabuco was also able to put himself through night school, eventually attaining a bachelor’s degree in business administration as well as a master’s degree in social psychology. This feat was made even more impressive by the fact that during this time Trabuco was working up to 60 hours per week. This rock-solid work ethic would continue to be a definitive characteristic of Trabuco over the course of his tenure with the bank.

By 1984, he had become one of the most well-credentialed and experienced bankers with Bradesco. It was that year that he was tapped for his first real executive role. Tasked with heading up the company’s public relations and marketing division, Trabuco quickly demonstrated his fast thinking and visionary acuity. He was able to dramatically improve the bank’s image throughout its primary markets. By the end of the 1980s, Bradesco had one of the strongest brands and most positively-perceived names in the state of Sao Paulo.

This success was parlayed into being appointed to the presidency of the firm’s financial planning division. Again, the characteristic hard work and talent for leadership proved synergistic. Trabuco was able to sharply increase both the unit’s total revenues and its profitability, turning it from an insignificant business line into one of the bank’s main drivers of revenue.

Eventually, Trabuco made it to the tippy top. In 2009, he was appointed CEO of Grupo Bradesco, a position in which he has served for the last nine years.

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